Fundamental Beliefs

The Gayle Wells Foundation for Early Onset Alzheimer’s & Care promotes the active and informed involvement of family members and friends, as well as the individual with early onset Alzheimer’s disease in the planning of support and services.   We believe that each person with early onset Alzheimer’s disease is a unique individual and should be treated as such.  Each family and individual has the right to learn about the disease and resources, and select the most appropriate options for their situation.  To the maximum extent possible, we believe that the decisions should be made by family and the individual with early onset Alzheimer’s disease, as they are able, in collaboration with friends, caregivers, employers, and healthcare providers.

Services should enhance and strengthen natural family and community supports for the individual with early onset Alzheimer’s disease and their family whenever possible. The service option designed for an individual with early onset Alzheimer’s disease should result in improved quality of life. Abusive treatment and neglect of any kind is not an option.

We believe that no single type of program or service will fill the needs of every individual with early onset Alzheimer’s disease and each person should have access to support services. Selection of programs, services, or methods of treatment should be on the basis of a full assessment of each person’s abilities, needs and interests.  We believe the individual needs of the person with early onset Alzheimer’s disease should be at the forefront of all programs, services, and treatments.

The Gayle Wells Foundation for Early Onset Alzheimer’s & Care believes that all individuals with early onset Alzheimer’s disease have the right to access appropriate services and supports based on their individual needs.  It is also our fundamental belief that every individual with early onset Alzheimer’s disease must be treated with dignity, respect, love, care, and compassion at all times throughout the progression of the disease.